Travel photography is one of my hobbies, which works well with my travel for work and fun. Some of my encounters with geology have occurred on weekend trips with geologists and non-geologists and some of my adventures have nothing to do with geology.

The San Francisquito Dam, the Vazquez Rocks, and the San Andreas Fault. Dr. Kevin Lewis taught me some geology as we wandered through the mountains above the San Fernando Valley.

Owens Valley. Some geology seen while on a road trip to Bodie, CA.

[A daysail out of Long Beach Harbor.](/photos/sailinglongbeach/index.html)_ A few of us took a Catalina 320 out of Long Beach Harbor for a day of sailing. Being a few days after the apocalyptic winds that swept through Los Angeles, we surpisingly had perfect wind conditions. The pod of dolphins that swam with us towards the end of the day, was just bonus. I pieced together some glimpses of the dolphins on video.

One of the benefits of a university like Caltech is the support that we recieve from the alumni. Often this support helped pay for field trips to various locations around the globe. For the geosciences, field trips are an important part of learning the science. Plus, travel is an adventure. Here are my photos from some of the Caltech trips I was able to go on.

Mojave and Kelso Dunes. Ge 151, Planetary Surfaces field trip

White Sands and Guadelupe Mountains. Sedimentology field trip

Peru. A Caltech sponsored trip to Peru to learn about the geophysics, culture, and history of southern Peru.

Pahoehoe I and Pahoehoe II. Basalt, basalt everywhere and not a drop of lava. A long standing tradition in the GPS division involves taking graduating students, both undergraduates and graduates, on a week long trip to the Big Island of Hawaii. The goal is to see the active volcanism on the island, but the trip is also a great informal reward for finishing. Although I did not defend until November 2011, I was able to go on the March 2011 trip. The trip was a lot of fun, but unfortunately we did not get to see active lava flow up close -- the primary lava flow on the island shut down just the week before.